May 24, 2017
   
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The Exercise-Mood Connection
Alice G. Walton

Being active is linked to greater well-being and less depression. The real news is it doesn’t take much. Read more >


Pups Help Kids Cope
Neil Wagner

The challenges of school and growing up are much easier to handle with a dog by your side. Read more >


Free Speech As a Cover for Racism
Leslie Carr

Free speech is often used after the fact to justify, or some might say, sanctify, racist comments. Read more >


Noise in Nature
Neil Wagner

Noise is increasingly polluting the peace and quiet of protected areas, disturbing plant and animal life. Read more >


Setting Kids Up to Stay Slender
Alice G. Walton

Children who find it hard to handle their emotions are more likely to become overweight. There is a simple way for parents to help. Read more >


Hallucinogens and Higher Consciousness
Neil Wagner

The brains of people who have taken LSD, psilocybin or ketamine light up in ways that may explain these hallucinogens' effects. Read more >


The Problem with Comfort Food
Esther Entin, M.D.

Using food to soothe kids is likely to lead to emotional eating and weight gain. Read more >


Why Kids Drop Out
Neil Wagner

Life crises contribute to many kids' decision to leave school. A little help navigating these rough times could prevent it. Read more >


Violent Video Games Increase Violence
Alice G. Walton

There's a link between the violence that we experience virtually and the violence that we act out in reality. Read more >


Sexism and Video Games
Esther Entin, M.D.

Playing video games is significantly associated with sexist attitudes, a French study has found. It's about how women are depicted. Read more >


Sexual Adventurers
Charlotte LoBuono

For many women vacation is a time of sexual exploration. While this can be empowering, it also brings risks. Read more >


Better Schools, At No Cost
Alice G. Walton

Enrichment doesn't have to cost money. Trusting, deep relationships at school can have a huge academic impact. Read more >


"A Robot Ate My Job"
Neil Wagner

Workers in both blue and white collar jobs are looking over their shoulders, worried that robots will replace them. Read more >


Are You an Information-Avoider?
Alice G. Walton

We think we want to learn things, but if the information “hurts,” we may try to avoid it. Read more >


Having Less Sex?
Neil Wagner

People are having sex less often. And it's not about work...or age. Read more >


Yoga and Breathing Ease Depression
Esther Entin, M.D.

Both high- and low-intensity courses in yoga and breathing techniques helped people suffering from depression. Read more >


Heading Off School Problems Before They Start
Esther Entin, M.D.

Some kids start school already behind. Early intervention helps. Read more >


What It Takes to Go Viral
Alice G. Walton

Everyone wants to know why some stories go viral. Brain scans offer an answer. Read more >


The Calculations of Cancer Patients
Neil Wagner

Weighing the pros and cons of treatment options is not easy for patients, particularly when they are reeling from a cancer diagnosis. Read more >


Low T? More News
Neil Wagner

A new series of studies of testosterone therapy and bone health, anemia, heart risks and memory have just been published. Read more >


Patient Surveys Change Doctors' Bedside Manners
Neil Wagner

Doctors took note when patients gave them mediocre ratings, taking steps to improve communication. Things got better. Read more >


Over-Medicated Seniors
Esther Entin, M.D.

Seniors are being given prescriptions that can muddle their minds and cause falls. Here is how over-prescribing can be avoided. Read more >


My Selfie is Better than Yours
Neil Wagner

Selfies are fun when you are the one taking them. Others' selfies are another story. Read more >


Give Your Mind A Hedge Against Memory Problems
Esther Entin, M.D.

Some surprising — and fulfilling — ways to reduce your chances of cognitive impairment. Read more >


Naughty or Nice?
Alice G. Walton

With kids, personality traits are pretty contagious. So it matters who their friends are. Read more >


Stop Fat Shaming
Charlotte LoBuono

When overweight people are stereotyped as incompetent, lazy or ugly, it's bad for their mental and physical health. Read more >


The Power of Mistakes
Leslie Carr

We all make mistakes. Some of us are better about using them to good advantage, however. Here's why. Read more >


The Right -- And Wrong -- Way to Give Kids a Time Out
Esther Entin, M.D.

Time outs are an effective way to discipline bad behavior, but you need to know how to give them. Read more >


Four Reasons to Join a Gym
Neil Wagner

If you are struggling with weight loss or fitness goals, check out the nearest gym. It could make all the difference. Read more >


"Really, Really Smart"
Alice G. Walton

When 7-year-olds are asked to pick someone really smart, they choose differently than they did when they were five. Read more >


The Case for Taking Teen Depression Seriously
Esther Entin, M.D.

Many parents see emotional turmoil as just part of adolescence. But it may be a sign of something more serious that therapy can change. Read more >


Childbirth Is a Dark Time for Some New Moms
Leslie Carr

The anxiety and depression that can haunt new mothers are finally receiving the attention they deserve. Read more >


Alcohol’s Effects on Memory
Alice G. Walton

Alcohol may make you unable to forget. And this matters for people with PTSD. Read more >


Dads Give High Marks to a School Readiness Program
Esther Entin, M.D.

When fathers read with their children, instead of to them, it's a win-win. Read more >


For Kids with Behavior Problems — Cybercycling
Neil Wagner

The exercise that virtual reality cycling programs offer can make a big difference for kids who find it hard to deal with school. Read more >


Helping Kids Sidestep Depression
Esther Entin, M.D.

Exercise not only reduces kids' depression, it lowers their chances of becoming depressed as teens. Read more >


France Outlaws Spanking
Neil Wagner

Fifty-two countries have laws against spanking. Not only does spanking not work, a study finds, it may bring on some undesirable behaviors. Read more >


Calm and Happy? There's an App for That
Neil Wagner

Clinicians have designed a set of apps to reduce depression and anxiety. They seem to help. Read more >


Why We Need More Fun at Work
Charlotte LoBuono

Managers who encourage policies that get workers to know each other have employees who learn more and faster on the job. Read more >


Grateful Dread
Neil Wagner

Not everyone finds it easy to feel grateful. For some, feeling like they owe a debt of gratitude is profoundly uncomfortable. Read more >


Have A Bad Boss?
Neil Wagner

There are basically two types of bad bosses — those who are dysfunctional and those who are are much darker. Read more >


Finding More Fun
Neil Wagner

It's more fun doing something on the fly, improvising, than following a master plan. Keep things loose. Read more >


Dazed and Confused
Neil Wagner

Giving antipsychotics to ill and aging patients with delusions deepens confusion — and worse. Read more >


Men and Nuts
Neil Wagner

Why do nuts, and walnuts especially, do so much for men? They can even boost men's moods. Read more >


Yogic Breathing Practices Lift Depression
Neil Wagner

People with severe depression who didn't respond to antidepressants were helped by these breathing techniques. Read more >


Math Prejudice
Neil Wagner

In kindergarten, girls and boys are equals when it comes to math. But by second grade... Read more >


Social Media Users Live Longer
Neil Wagner

People who are active on Facebook and other networking sites tend to live longer. Coincidence? Probably not. Read more >


No, Really, You Look Great
Alice G. Walton

Lying gets easier if you do it enough, British researchers have found. It's like any habit. Read more >


Meditation for Prisoners
Neil Wagner

Transcendental meditation can help prisoners confront the trauma that helps put so many behind bars. Read more >


Want to Curb Kids' Electronic Media Use?
Esther Entin, M.D.

First you need a plan. Setting limits now will pay off. These guidelines will get you on your way. Read more >


Taking the Guesswork Out of Depression Treatment
Alice G. Walton

Finding the right treatment for depression is not easy. Researchers may have found a way. Read more >


Parenting In The Digital Age
Esther Entin, M.D.

Parents now have to juggle the demands of their children with those of their electronic devices. Read more >


A Double Whammy to the Heart
Esther Entin, M.D.

First heart attacks are most likely to occur when these two triggers occur together. You can bring both under better control. Read more >


Contraception and Depression
Esther Entin, M.D.

Depression is an under-appreciated side effect of hormonal contraception. Certain women are especially vulnerable. Read more >


Testosterone, No Magic Bullet
Neil Wagner

Studies of testosterone treatment paint a murky picture of what has become a billion dollar industry. Read more >


Crazy Cats
Neil Wagner

Is your cat driving you crazy? Two veterinarians and an animal behaviorist have a suggestion that should help. Read more >


Fertility Plummets When Women Are Stressed
Alice G. Walton

A 45% reduced conception rate is clear evidence for why women — and men — need to take stress reduction seriously. Read more >


Help for Kids Facing Surgery
Charlotte LoBuono

There's a surprising way to reduce kids' anxiety before surgery, no drugs required. Read more >


Facebook Strikes Back
Neil Wagner

Facebook can foster envy and self-loathing, but the effect of certain types of messages is positive. Read more >


Depressing Facts About Depression Treatment
Neil Wagner

Less than a third of the people in the U.S. who are depressed get treatment. Guess who's most affected? Read more >


Senior Serenity
Charlotte LoBuono

Most seniors are happier than people in their 20s and 30s, making them an untapped resource for the mental health of young adults. Read more >


Child Abuse Shortens Lives
Esther Entin, M.D.

Women who were abused in childhood don't live as long as those who weren't. Men are less affected. Read more >


Good Dog!
Neil Wagner

Which pleases your dog more: praise or food? Brain scans tell a surprising story. Read more >


The Perks of Being a Volunteer
Neil Wagner

Volunteering, especially later in life, seems to bring health and happiness. Read more >


Your Child's “Overnight Therapy” — Sleep
Esther Entin, M.D.

Every parent knows what a tired child is like. What they may not know is that sleep problems can create emotional problems. Read more >


Should You Trust Your Gut?
Alice G. Walton

When business execs had to evaluate candidates, they thought their instincts would work. Turns out they were wrong. Read more >


Frape — A Prank or Something More Sinister?
Neil Wagner

When a friend logs on as you and posts content to your social media account, you've been fraped. Read more >


A Recipe for Friendship and Trust
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

We like people who eat like us even more than we like people who look and dress like us. Read more >


The Rich Get Richer, The Poor Get Less Healthcare
Neil Wagner

A Harvard study finds the rich are buying more care; the poor, less. Read more >


Is Marijuana Addiction Real?
Alice G. Walton

Over time marijuana use seems to dull the responsiveness of the reward center of the brain, making it less sensitive to pleasure. Read more >


Binge-Eating, Disordered and Not
Esther Entin, M.D.

Binge-eating disorder is not just about out-of-control eating. It takes an emotional toll, too. Read more >


Drinking and Doctor Visits
Neil Wagner

Alcohol consumption is a topic that often doesn't come up at doctor's visits, and it should. Read more >


How Australia Ended Mass Shootings
Neil Wagner

There hasn't been a mass shooting in Australia since it enacted new gun laws in 1996. Not one. Read more >


Saving Billions, With Trees
Neil Wagner

When California measured the value to citizens of the trees lining its streets, the savings added up. Read more >


A Global Look At Anxiety
Esther Entin, M.D.

A review of anxiety research from around the world finds who is more likely to be anxious. Read more >


The Art of Stress Relief
Alice G. Walton

Making art helps reduce stress — it doesn't matter whether you are good at it or not. Read more >


Antidepressants for Kids?
Esther Entin, M.D.

An international review study found only one antidepressant was reliably useful for those under 18. Read more >


Emotional Support for Job Seekers
Neil Wagner

Looking for for work is nobody's idea of a good time. But you can prevent yourself from sabotaging your best efforts. Read more >


Daughters' Weight Is a Parental Minefield
Charlotte LoBuono

Parents of overweight teens may be tempted to remind/nag their children not to eat. Don't. Do this. Read more >


How to Be a Bad Boss
Neil Wagner

From nurses to stone masons, workers reported what their superiors do that increases job dissatisfaction and lowers morale. Read more >


Marital Discord, Written on the Body
Neil Wagner

The way you handle disputes with your partner can show up as health issues down the road. Read more >


How Economics Affects Our Ability to Delay Gratification
Leslie Carr

Resisting temptation is not always a good thing, at least not when rewards are scarce. Read more >


Mental Health Via Email
Alice G. Walton

Online mental health services can help people with anxiety and depression. Read more >


What Aging Well Really Means
Neil Wagner

A good old age may not mean being free of ailments. More important are seniors' mobility and sociability. Read more >


Foods That Reduce Aggression
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Violent, antisocial kids behaved better when their diets were rich in this nutrient. Read more >


Help for the Loneliness of Dementia
Neil Wagner

A program that helps seniors with early-onset dementia suggests ways to ease loneliness. Read more >


Eat Less, Feel Great
Neil Wagner

Cutting your daily calories by as little as 12 percent can increase your energy, happiness, sex drive, and yes, weight loss. Read more >


Yoga, For Body And Brain
Alice G. Walton

Skip the brain-training. Yoga and meditation can do more for your mood and memory. Read more >


Parents' Effects on the Brain
Esther Entin, M.D.

Supportive parenting actually leaves its mark on key areas of kids' brains, making them better able to handle stress and emotion. Read more >


Do Dogs Like Hugs?
Neil Wagner

An unofficial study is garnering a lot of attention for suggesting that dogs don't like to be hugged. Read more >


Ease Depression, Help the Heart
Neil Wagner

Depression is not good for your cardiovascular system, but there is a way to erase the risk. Read more >


An Acid Trip to The Self
Alice G. Walton

LSD increases communication among high-level regions of the brain, erasing boundaries. Read more >


What Uncertainty Means for Stress
Neil Wagner

Would you rather know definitely that something bad is going to happen, or be unsure of it? Read more >


Not All Mind-Wandering Is the Same
Alice G. Walton

There's a big difference between letting your mind wander and having it take off on its own. Read more >


Targeted Ads Tell You Who You Think You Are
Alice G. Walton

Online ads that follow you around the Web offer flattering identities as part of their sales pitch. Read more >


To Prevent Falls, Try Tai Chi
Neil Wagner

The fear of a fall can leave seniors housebound. But even those who have had a fall can recover balance with the help of this ancient art. Read more >


Light Therapy for Cancer Patients
Alice G. Walton

It is not uncommon for cancer patients to be depressed. Light therapy can be a non-invasive treatment. Read more >


The Bolshoi Path to Enlightenment
Neil Wagner

It was no particular surprise when a study found meditation makes you wiser, but ballet? Read more >


Violent Neighborhoods and Teen Homicide
Esther Entin, M.D.

Certain physical changes to violent areas can improve safety and could reduce teen homicides. Read more >


Friends Don't Help Friends Lose Weight
Neil Wagner

However well-intentioned, you really shouldn't tell a friend on a diet that ice cream is a bad idea. Read more >


Smartphones: Not So Smart in A Crisis
Neil Wagner

Smartphones can give us physical directions, but they are pathetic at emotional support. Read more >


Is Your Cell Phone Making You Sad?
Alice G. Walton

Worried about how much time you spend on your phone or computer? Here's one way to think about it. Read more >


What Transgender Kids Need From Their Parents
Charlotte LoBuono

If your child feels his or her gender ldentity is different from their biological sex, your support can make a huge difference. Read more >


Give T A Chance
Neil Wagner

Sex lives and mood improved when older men with low T used testosterone gel. Read more >


Enraged Mice
Neil Wagner

New brain research offers more insight into where rage comes from, and how it's kept in check. Read more >


A Non-Prescription Way to Fight Depression
Neil Wagner

Exercise and meditation, used together, can be an effective one-two punch for depression. Read more >


Assaults Plague Emergency Medical Workers
Neil Wagner

Who knew it was so dangerous to answer a call for help? Assaults on paramedics are too common. Read more >


Waistlines Never Take a Vacation
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

People gain an average of just under a pound during a vacation. They rarely take the weight off. Read more >


The De-Clutter Diet
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Clearing your counters is a good way to cut calories. Messy kitchens promote snacking. Read more >


Wired to Create: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Creative Mind
Scott Barry Kaufman and Carolyn Gregoire



Frozen in the Spotlight
Alice G. Walton

Performance anxiety is all-too-familiar to many. Now scientists know why it occurs. Read more >


Better Learning Through Collaboration
Neil Wagner

Kids look at more of the angles when they solve problems and make choices if they work with others. Read more >


Friends With Benefits
Neil Wagner

Having a social network of friends does good things for your health. But at certain ages quality matters more than quantity. Read more >


Your Brain, In the Zone
Alice G. Walton

Understanding the neural mechanisms behind creativity may tell us the conditions under which it is most likely to arise. Read more >


Students Fight Bullying Best
Esther Entin, M.D.

The most powerful way to prevent bullying may be to enlist the influence of popular peers. Read more >


No Parents Necessary
Alice G. Walton

Doctor visits are a prime time for teens to take charge of their health. Parents can be obstacles. Read more >


Unpacking The Sensory Overload of Autism
Esther Entin, M.D.

The brains of children with ASD have less of a neurotransmitter that helps us filter out competing stimuli. Read more >


Don't Worry; Be Unhappy
Neil Wagner

Feeling down won't make you unhealthy. In fact, it is likely the other way around. Read more >


A One-Stop Treatment for Phobia?
Alice G. Walton

Could phobias be treated in as little as one session? Research is starting to say ‘yes.’ Read more >


Mushy Brains On TV
Neil Wagner

People who watch a lot of TV are less able to plan, problem-solve or process info quickly. Read more >


The High Price of a Toxic Coworker
Alice G. Walton

Domineering, angry workers are not good for a company's bottom line. Read more >


More Than A Meal
Esther Entin, M.D.

Programs like Meals on Wheels do more than provide nutrition. They help combat loneliness. Read more >


The Often-Overlooked Reason Why We Are Overweight
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

The emotional aspects of food and eating are often overlooked when people are trying to diet. Read more >


High Intensity Shoppers
Alice G. Walton

The holidays bring out the best in those for whom shopping is a competitive sport. Read more >


A New Light on Depression
Esther Entin, M.D.

Light therapy appears to help even those with non-seasonal depression. Read more >


Parents, Dial Down the Pressure
Alice G. Walton

High expectations can be good for kids. But when they are unrealistic, they can backfire. Read more >


Sex And Happiness
Neil Wagner

Having sex once a week is a good recipe for a happy relationship. Read more >


A Depression-Diabetes Connection?
Neil Wagner

People who are insulin resistant and depressed may be helped by treatment with the diabetes drug, pioglitazone. Read more >


The Two Faces Of Social Media
Leslie Carr

The time teens spend on Facebook can increase stress. But there's another, beneficial, side to it. Read more >


When Work Worries Follow You Home
Alice G. Walton

Having trouble disconnecting your brain from work? Some simple steps can help. Read more >


Shorter Days, Darker Moods
Neil Wagner

Seasonal affective disorder is often treated with light, but something else seems to work better. Read more >


Soothing With Song
Alice G. Walton

If you’re trying to calm your baby, try singing. It works even better than talking. Read more >


The Farm — And Dog — Effect
Alice G. Walton

When kids grow up with dogs (and cows or sheep), their risk of asthma is reduced. Read more >


Facebook For The Fit
Neil Wagner

Finding it hard to exercise? An online buddy can really help get you out the door. Read more >


You've Been Phubbed
Neil Wagner

Snubbing by cell phone — phubbing — is bad for relationships. Read more >


Relaxation Puts A Dent In Healthcare Costs
Alice G. Walton

People who meditate or do yoga use far fewer healthcare services than those who don't. Insurers, take note. Read more >


Depressed Dads-To-Be
Neil Wagner

Men with a baby on the way can become depressed, too. And too often they are overlooked. Read more >


Bullies Can Be Stopped
Esther Entin, M.D.

Anti-bullying laws really can make a difference. Many states are having success. Here's how. Read more >


Compulsive Texting And Academic Achievement
Neil Wagner

Some teens find it difficult to stop texting or ignore texts. Compulsive texting can cause academic problems. Read more >


Parents And Bulimia: From Part Of The Problem To Part Of The Solution
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Parents used to be viewed as a cause of bulimia. Now they are part of an effective treatment. Read more >


Screen Time Resets Teens’ Body Clocks
Esther Entin, M.D.

Late nights in front of a screen make it hard for teens to fall asleep. Parents may need to step in. Read more >


The Best and Worst Places for Older People to Live
Neil Wagner

What countries are the best places to grow old? It depends on a how far pensions go, the social fabric, and some other intangibles. Read more >


As Gun Laws Go, So Go Suicides
Neil Wagner

When gun licensing is enacted, suicides drop by as much as 40 percent. It's the opposite when such laws are repealed. Read more >


Social Media's Emotional Costs
Alice G. Walton

The pressure to keep up with social media, particularly at night, does not do anything good for teens’ mental health. Read more >


Emotional Stories Make Emotionally-Savvy Kids
Alice G. Walton

When kids understand emotions better they can manage their own emotions and behavior better, too. Read more >


Oh No! Where's My Phone?
Neil Wagner

See how you stack up when it comes to the anxiety some feel when they can't find their phones. Read more >


Helping Kids Develop A Healthy Relationship with Food
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Some children love the taste and smell of food. This isn't bad, as long as parents help them learn to know when to stop. Read more >


Mindfulness Training Eases PTSD
Alice G. Walton

Mindfulness-based stress reduction helped ease veterans’ symptoms of post-traumatic stress. Read more >


Senior Sex In A Post-Viagra World
Barbara L. Marshall, Ph.D.

More seniors are enjoying sex, but a worrisome emphasis on performance is creeping in. Read more >


Sometimes Picky Eating Is Something More Serious
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Lots of kids are picky eaters. But selective eating can be a sign of a more serious set of issues. Read more >


Intellectual Stimulation, A Hedge Against Addiction?
Alice G. Walton

“Intellectually” stimulated mice are less likely to become addicts. The same may be true for humans. Read more >


Bullying Starts In Front of The TV
Esther Entin, M.D.

Children who are bullied usually have problems socializing. TV time doesn't help them learn social skills. Read more >


Freedom of Choice Meets Health Policy
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Behavioral economists have some interesting ideas about the best ways to improve our eating habits. Read more >


When Parents Micro-Manage
Alice G. Walton

Even when parents are warm and caring, their “helicoptering” can reduce self esteem — and worse. Read more >


With Autism, Early Treatment Offers Lasting Benefits
Neil Wagner

When parents and therapists work with young children at home, one-on-one, benefits continue even after treatment has ended. Read more >


One Reason You May Feel Anxious — Too Much Sitting
Neil Wagner

When you feel anxious, sitting may seem like a good idea, but it could make it worse. Read more >


A Picture of Problem Drinking
Esther Entin, M.D.

Alcohol use disorders are common and often come with mental and physical health problems. Read more >


Kids in U.S. Drinking Too Little Water Each Day
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Inadequate hydration affects children’s physical, emotional, and mental functioning. Ideas for helping kids get enough. Read more >


Don't Malign Millennials, Mentor Them
Neil Wagner

Hey, Boomers, stop complaining. What if you had had YouTube and video streaming at age 18? Read more >


Give Your Brain a Rest (Literally)
Alice G. Walton

Getting good sleep helps the brain form new memories, giving you even more justification for a nap. Read more >


Singing in The Brain
Esther Entin, M.D.

Singing — or listening to singing — can help those with dementia feel better emotionally and mentally. Read more >


The Executive in Your Head Is No Friend to Creativity
Neil Wagner

The executive in your head — the planner and decider — is no friend to creativity. Read more >


What Noise Is Doing to Your Waistline
Neil Wagner

The more noise from trains, planes and automobiles you hear daily, the bigger your waist, and the more belly fat you are likely to have. Read more >


Segregation Is Bad for The Brain
Neil Wagner

Even today, African Americans who attended segregated schools are proof that there is no separate but equal when it comes to education. Read more >


Cell Phones, Boredom and Playgrounds
Neil Wagner

It is hard to avoid turning to your cell phone at the playground. But you should. Read more >


Stress Really Does Take Years Off Your Life
Charlotte LoBuono

Post-traumatic stress doesn't just bring on emotional issues. It accelerates physical aging, too. Read more >


Not So Happy for You: Why Bragging Backfires
Neil Wagner

Self-promotion is everywhere. But its rewards are less certain than braggarts might think. Read more >


What Your Online Dating Photo Says About You
Charlotte LoBuono

If you photoshopped your profile photo to make yourself look better, you may want to think again. Read more >


Dieting? Prepare for The Emotional Ride
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Don't let emotions sabotage your diet. Preparation can really help. Read more >


Parenthood Puts An End to Couples' Equal Workloads
Leslie Carr

When a first child arrives, couples' equal workloads go out the window. But it's not all dad's fault. Read more >


The Upside of Stress -- Why Stress is Good for You and How to Get Good at It
Kelly McGonigal, Ph.D.



The Spark Behind Creativity May Also Ease Depression
Neil Wagner

When a mild electrical current is applied to the brain, creativity rises. Read more >


Under Pressure? Try Self-Affirmation
Annie Sofield Reed, LCSW

When we want to do a good job, self-affirmations are a good way to counteract our worries about not being able to do well enough. Read more >


Taking a Step Back from a Stressor May Be the First Step in Recovering from It
Alice G. Walton

Taking a mental step back from a problem may be just the trick to solving it. Read more >


Start Now: Recovering from Psychological Trauma
J. Douglas Bremner, M.D.

More than half of us will be exposed to some form of a psychological trauma which can lead to PTSD. Read more >


The Perks of Being Invisible
Leslie Carr

Special glasses tricked people into perceiving their bodies had disappeared. So did social anxiety. Read more >


Anti-Texting Laws: An Early Report Card
Neil Wagner

When states have laws that are designed to penalize texting, they help save lives. Read more >


Helping Others Can Ease Social Anxiety
Alice G. Walton

When teens with social anxiety help others, they come to feel more comfortable in their own skin. Read more >


Gratitude Helps the Ailing Heart
Neil Wagner

Gratitude appears to reduce inflammation and reduce the risk of a second heart attack. Read more >


In Synch: The Power of Moving Together
Annie Sofield Reed, LCSW

Singing or playing in unison fosters emotional harmony. It's a good way to get children cooperating. Read more >


Air Pollution Raises Anxiety Levels
Esther Entin, M.D.

Air pollution puts your emotional health as well as your physical health at risk. Read more >


Why We “Love” Bad News
Alice G. Walton

Newspapers know that bad news draws us in more than good news. But there is a cost. Read more >


Aging Brings Greater Trust, Happiness
Neil Wagner

There are some, and one at least can make you happier. Read more >


Depression in the Parents Can Trigger Behavior Problems in the Kids
Alice G. Walton

Parents' moods are not lost on their children. A parent's depression can create behavior problems. Read more >


Being Lonely is Bad for Your Health
Neil Wagner

Loneliness can be a health hazard, just like being sedentary, or overweight. Read more >


Atypical Antipsychotics: What Parents Need to Know
Esther Entin, M.D.

Antipsychotic drugs can be lifesavers for kids. But parents, you have a major role to play. Read more >


Use of Marijuana May Have Lasting Effects on Memory
Alice G. Walton

Marijuana use in adolescence may have lasting effects on memory. Read more >


“You’re The Best!” The Perils of Overvaluing Our Children
Esther Entin, M.D.

Overblown praise often has the opposite effect parents intend. How to give kids the support they need. Read more >


Chronic Fatigue Is Real, Not a State of Mind
Neil Wagner

Two studies put to rest the idea that chronic fatigue sufferers are malingerers or worse. Read more >


Bouts of Anger, Stress, Can Bring on A Heart Attack
Alice G. Walton

Anger management may be good heart attack prevention. Read more >


Walking The Road to Higher Learning
Neil Wagner

When a computer science teacher had his classes walk as he lectured, something interesting happened. Read more >


The Impact of Parental Depression
Esther Entin, M.D.

When people become depressed, it can be tough on those around them; when those people are parents, the stakes are higher. Read more >


For Sleeplessness, The Best Medicine May be Meditation
Alice G. Walton

Before trying medication, seniors having trouble sleeping should try a short course on meditation. Read more >


Brain Scans Can Predict Depression and Anxiety down the Road
Alice G. Walton

Some of us have brains that react more vigorously to stress and fear. Knowing this could help prevent problems down the road. Read more >


Online Dating: Putting Science on Your Side
Neil Wagner

From your screen name to the colors in your profile picture, tips for putting your best foot forward online. Read more >


Art, Nature, and Spirituality Can Help Protect Against Disease
Alice G. Walton

Experiencing a sense of awe may reduce inflammation – and depression. Read more >


Threats to Privacy on the Internet
Neil Wagner

Those privacy policies you click on to order apps or purchase goods won't protect privacy. Read more >


Teens’ Misperceptions of Others’ Risky Behavior
Alice G. Walton

Teens misjudge one another a lot, and it can lead them into trouble. Read more >


Depression Makes “Binge-Watching” Television More Likely
Alice G. Walton

Binge-watching TV is riskier for your mental and physical health than it sounds. Read more >


Depression Too Common Among Teens
Esther Entin, M.D.

Depression is more common among teens than most people realize. Parents, know the warning signs. Read more >


A Surprising Way to Heal from a Breakup
Alice G. Walton

Writing or talking about a breakup can help you process the pain, but better talk with strangers. Read more >


Small Screens Can Be a Big Problem at Bedtime
Esther Entin, M.D.

There are some good reasons why having a phone in the room at bedtime makes kids so tired the next day. Read more >


Family Pets Improve Autistic Children's Social Skills
Neil Wagner

Cats, dogs and other pets give children with autism a way to learn how to deal with others and assert themselves. Read more >


Why the Guilt-Ridden Make Good Employees
Alice G. Walton

People who are prone to feeling guilty make the best workers. Read more >


Body Cameras Can Prevent Violence
Neil Wagner

Body cameras cut police violence by over 50% and could perhaps have saved Michael Brown's life. Read more >


Social Support, Not Criticism, Leads to More Weight Loss
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

People trying to lose weight don't need friends' misguided remarks. Simple acceptance helps a great deal. Read more >


Virtual Body-Swapping Can Help Address Unconscious Racial Biases
Alice G. Walton

Virtual body-swapping may be the key to reducing racial prejudice. Read more >


Mild Cogniitive Impairment: What It Is, What It's Not
Esther Entin, M.D.

You're over 60 and are starting to find it hard to remember things. Are you on the road to senility? Read more >


How Light from E-Readers Disrupts Your Sleep
Sami Hocine

The blue light computers and other screens emit can make it hard to get a restful night's sleep. Read more >


Social Media Helps Keep Seniors Connected
Neil Wagner

Get Mom and Dad a broadband connection. Social networks ease seniors' loneliness, too. Read more >


Workplace Strategies for Non-Drinkers
Neil Wagner

It can be hard to be the lone non-drinker, especially at office parties. Here are some ways to cope. Read more >


Marriage Problems Take Their Toll on the Heart
Annie Sofield Reed, LCSW

Elderly couples with marital problems are more likely to have cardiac problems as well. Counseling can help. Read more >


Seniors Vulnerable to Gambling's Allure
Esther Entin, M.D.

Gambling offers seniors excitement and a way to socialize. What could be bad? Actually, plenty. Read more >


New Insights into Why Some People Are Resistant to Stress, Depression
Sami Hocine

Some people are just not affected by stress very much. A new study suggests why and offers hope for new treatments for depression. Read more >


Speaking a Second Language May Keep the Brain in Good Shape
Alice G. Walton

Speaking more than one language is one of the most powerful ways to keep your mind sharp. Read more >


Children Eat Healthier When Parents Set Food Rules
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Kids become better at controlling their own eating when parents set a few rules. They whine less, too. Read more >


The Science of Choking Under Pressure
Sami Hocine

Performing our best under pressure is not easy, and people have different reasons for choking. Read more >


Of All the Emotions, Sadness Lasts the Longest
Alice G. Walton

Of all the emotions, one lasts the longest. Here's why. Read more >


When It Comes to Parent-Child Communication, More Channels Can Help
Annie Sofield Reed, LCSW

When kids move out, parents often struggle to find the right way to communicate. Read more >


Survey Catalogues Americans' Fears
Neil Wagner

What do people fear most? A survey finds It is not always rational...or reasonable. Read more >


Researchers Find An Ingenious Way to Measure Seniors' Drinking
Neil Wagner

Ask someone how much they drink, and the answer they'll give you may not jibe with the number of bottles in the trash. Read more >


Workplace Bullies
Neil Wagner

Over a third of U.S. workers report being bullied at work. Co-workers can help and still avoid repercussions. Read more >


Experts Agree: Violent Gaming is Linked to Aggression in Kids
Alice G. Walton

The exact relationship between violent video games and violence and aggression among children isn't clear, but the fact they are linked is. Read more >


Patients Find Psychiatric Appointments Are Hard to Come By
Neil Wagner

Getting an appointment with a psychiatrist in some states is nearly impossible. Read more >


How to Lose Friends and Alienate People
Alice G. Walton

Talking about that chance meeting with George Clooney or your trip to Machu Picchu may not be the social lubricant you hope. Read more >


Multitasking Linked to Changes in the Brain
Sami Hocine

Multitasking may result in a loss of density in gray matter in a key brain area. Read more >


Immature Connections Among Brain Networks May Be Behind ADHD
Esther Entin, M.D.

The connections among brain networks in people with ADHD are immature. Can they be helped to develop normally? Read more >


A “Dimmer Switch” for Depression
Alice G. Walton

Some people react more strongly to negative life events than others. It’s all about an overactive “disappointment pathway.” Read more >


You Are What You (and Your Full-Figured Friends) Eat
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Who you eat with can affect what you eat, especially if your friends are overweight. Read more >


A Blood Test to Predict Depression and Treatment Effects in Adults
Sami Hocine

Markers in the blood of people who are or will become depressed offer a step forward in early diagnosis and treatment. Read more >


Many in Long-Term Care Receive Medications of Questionable Benefit
Esther Entin, M.D.

Too many nursing home residents with advanced dementia are given medications that offer little benefit. Read more >


Networking: Dirty Work or Community-Building?
Alice G. Walton

Self-promotion can leave people feeling dirty. Literally. But it doesn’t have to. Read more >


Changing A Memory’s Emotional Color and Maybe Its Impact
Sami Hocine

Events connected to strong emotions are colored by those feelings. Scientists are figuring out how to disconnect the two. Read more >


Biochemical Keys to Stress and Resilience Are Uncovered
Alice G. Walton

Some people seem resistant to stress, while others are susceptible to it. Researchers are starting to understand why. Read more >


Good Neighbors — and Neighborhoods — Make Good Health
Esther Entin, M.D.

Good relationships with your neighbors and a feeling that you belong to a community are good for heart health. Read more >


Young People with Depression Have “Hyper-Connected” Brain Networks
Alice G. Walton

The brains of depressed people have different, more intense patterns of connections. What does that mean for treatment? Read more >


Severe Depression Helped by A Combo of Antidepressants and Talk Therapy
Alice G. Walton

Antidepressants and talk therapy together may be the key to overcoming severe depression. Read more >


Family Intervention Helps Prevent Psychosis in Vulnerable Youth
Esther Entin, M.D.

When family communication and dynamics improve, psychosis can be nipped in the bud. Read more >


Nature Really Does Nurture
Esther Entin, M.D.

Mothers who spend more time in green spaces are less likely to have low birth weight babies. Read more >


Lack of Motivation May Masquerade as Cognitive Decline
Alice G. Walton

As people age, it can be hard to tell whether memory or motivation is fading. Read more >


Finding Narcissists is Easy
Leslie Carr

Figuring out who is a narcissist is pretty easy. All you have to do is ask. Read more >


Good News at the Wrong Time Isn’t Good News at All
Alice G. Walton

The timing of good news is almost as important as the news itself. Read more >


Early Lead Exposure in Children Linked to Depression and Anxiety
Alice G. Walton

In addition to harming brain development, lead exposure is also linked to emotional problems like depression and anxiety. Read more >


Mixing Energy Drinks and Alcohol Can Make You Drink More
Alice G. Walton

When people mix energy drinks with alcohol, they tend to drink more. Read more >


Brain Patterns Predict Stock Market Bubbles
Sami Hocine

What is it that inspires some investors to leave the market before a crash? They use a different part of their brains than the rest of us. Read more >


Unstructured Time Helps Develop Children's “Executive” Skills
Esther Entin, M.D.

Children learn the “executive” skills that will help them run their lives best when they have unstructured time. Read more >


Details Emerge on The Link Between Stress and Heart Disease
Charlotte LoBuono

Chronic stress — the kind faced by doctors in the ICU — increases white blood cells that can cause life-threatening plaques to form. Read more >


What Stress Does to Your Memory
Sami Hocine

High levels of stress hormones reduce interconnections among cells in the brain, interfering with our ability to remember. Read more >


The Art of Cheering Up Friends
Alice G. Walton

The best way to cheer someone up may depend on how robust or fragile their self esteem is. Read more >


An Obsession with Popularity Can Handicap Teens' Social Development
Esther Entin, M.D.

Kids obsessed with who's cool may be less popular later in life. They don't know how to make friends. Read more >


Children from Divorced Homes May Be at Risk for Weight Problems
Alice G. Walton

Children of divorce are more likely to be overweight or obese. Especially boys. Read more >


ADHD Stimulant Treatment May Help Prevent Smoking
Esther Entin, M.D.

People with ADHD are often smokers and face serious health problems. Stimulant drugs for the disorder may reduce this risk. Read more >


Getting Active in Your 70s (or Later) Can Reduce the Risk of Disability
Alice G. Walton

Reduce your chances of landing in a nursing home -- walk a few blocks more. It may be all you need. Read more >


Discrimination and Favoritism May Be The Same Thing
Alice G. Walton

We think of discrimination as being about hate and holding certain people back. But it can be just the opposite. Read more >


Psilocybin Shows Potential As Treatment for Depression
Leslie Carr

Psilocybin, found in certain mushrooms, appears to help prevent depression and anxiety by enhancing mood. Read more >


The Stress of Family Conflicts Increases the Risk of Premature Death
Charlotte LoBuono

The stress of conflict in our relationships with family and friends can actually shorten our lives. Pick your battles. Read more >


No Duping the Anti-Dopers
Sami Hocine

Athletes using performance-enhancing drugs have been a step ahead of the agencies meant to police them. No more. Read more >


Marriage More Likely to End in Divorce If Wife Becomes Ill
Charlotte LoBuono

When a married woman becomes ill, divorce may loom on the horizon. But the same is not true for men. Read more >


Bullying's Effects Seen in Adulthood
Charlotte LoBuono

We tend to think of bullying as schoolyard behavior, but it can affect victims even as adults. Read more >


Internet Use Can Offer Seniors Friends with Emotional Benefits
Alice G. Walton

For seniors, spending more time online can be a way to stay connected socially and ward off depression. Read more >


Depressed Brains Boosted to a More Resilient State
Sami Hocine

Mice prone to depression became resistant to stress and depression after a jump-start. Read more >


Physicians Take on Gun Violence
Esther Entin, M.D.

Because of their special understanding of family issues, doctors can play a big role when it comes to preventing gun violence, according to a new ACP policy statement. Read more >


Marijuana's Bad Effects on the Brain
Michael J. Gertner

Marijuana may ease the pain and nausea associated with chemotherapy, but it also leaves certain brain areas abnormally enlarged. Read more >


Let's Talk About It Over Dinner: When Blood Sugar Drops, Anger Levels Rise
Alice G. Walton

Couples get angrier with each other when they are hungry, and they have the voodoo dolls to prove it. Read more >


Early Morning Light May Help Keep Weight under Control
Alice G. Walton

Getting some early morning sun may not only wake you up – it may help you slim down. Read more >


Stress Makes Allergies Worse
Leslie Carr

Stress appears to make allergies worse. Calming the mind can help. Read more >


All Joy And No Fun: The Paradox of Modern Parenthood
Jennifer Senior



Mephedrone Just As Dangerous, and Perhaps More Addictive, Than MDMA
Charlotte LoBuono

Mephedrone, a newer club drug has effects similar to those of MDMA, but it appears to be more addictive. Read more >


Violent Video Games and Aggression
Esther Entin, M.D.

Playing violent video games makes kids prone to seeing others as hostile and acting aggressively. Read more >


Stress Can Reduce a Woman's Chances of Becoming Pregnant
Alice G. Walton

Stress can greatly reduce a woman’s odds of becoming pregnant. Read more >


New Hints at The Brain Chemistry Behind Anxiety
Michael J. Gertner

The brain chemistry of people with anxiety may make it more difficult for them to turn off activity. Luckily, there appears to be a way to change this. Read more >


More Evidence for Bullying's Emotional Toll
Esther Entin, M.D.

Bullying casts a long shadow. There are things parents can do to reduce the emotional, physical, and psychological damage. Read more >


In Relationships, A Good Foundation Matters More than Communication
Alice G. Walton

Conflict happens, and can even make relationships stronger. But you need one ingredient. Read more >


Quitting Smoking Can Significantly Improve Mental Health
Alice G. Walton

People who smoke usually feel it helps them cope with stress and anxiety, but that's not true. It actually causes those feelings. Read more >


Life After Weight Loss Surgery
Leslie Carr

Bariatric surgery can help some lose enough weight to improve their health, but it is not problem-free. Read more >


A New Brain Region Is Implicated in Anxiety
Alice G. Walton

When we are anxious a brain region long-believed to calm responsiveness actually seems to excite it. Read more >


Study Reaffirms the Key Roles Oxytocin and Chloride Play in Autism
Neil Wagner

Oxytocin helps babies' cells adjust to the shift from womb to world. ASD kids' cells appear to lack this transition, and that may be possible to change. Read more >


Late Night Smartphone Use Interferes with Productivity
Neil Wagner

People who use their smartphones late at night are less productive the next day. Read more >


Too Few Doctors Talk to Teen Patients About Sex
Charlotte LoBuono

Doctors tend not to discuss sex with their teenaged patients. What a wasted opportunity. Read more >


A Different Approach to Self-Control
Neil Wagner

Our willpower can fail us when we are tired or stressed. But how we view the problem could be the problem. Read more >


Fewer Psychiatrists Accept Health Insurance
Neil Wagner

Obamacare promotes greater access to mental health services but few psychiatrists accept insurance. Read more >


For Teens, Sleep Is a Family Affair
Esther Entin, M.D.

Puberty wreaks havoc on teens' sleep cycles; so do teens' family and social relationships. Read more >


Media Coverage of Traumatic Events and Acute Stress
Alice G. Walton

It's OK to be informed, but binge-watching the news when disaster strikes can cause traumatic stress. Read more >


Sacrosine Shows Promise As a New Way to Relieve Depression
Neil Wagner

Sarcosine, found in muscles and other body tissues, improved mood better than a popular antidepressant. Read more >


Psychobiotics, A Possible New Treatment for Depression
Alice G. Walton

We know probiotics are good for GI heath. They may also affect mental health. Read more >


How Couples Use Texting Can Bring Them Closer, Drive Them Apart
Charlotte LoBuono

Text messages offer lovers another way to whisper endearments. But some texts just shouldn't be sent. Read more >


Monkey Mind, A Memoir of Anxiety
Daniel Smith



Cell Phones at Meetings: Rules of Engagement for the New Civil War
Neil Wagner

Cell phones make the business world go round, but they also derail many meetings -- and careers. Read more >


A Promising New Route to Treating Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
Alice G. Walton

The “hunger hormone” ghrelin may help short-circuit PTSD. A vaccine may be possible. Read more >


Do It Yourself: Simple Chores Around the House Boost Health
Alice G. Walton

Do-it-yourself work around the house can help keep the heart in shape. Read more >


Young Children Behave Better When They Have a Consistent Bedtime
Esther Entin, M.D.

Young children need to go to bed at a regular, consistent time. Think of it as a miracle cure for bad behavior. Read more >


How Well You Cope with Rejection May Be Up to Your Brain
Neil Wagner

Painful feelings of rejection actually are rooted in the brain, and may be cured there. Read more >


A Parental Wake-Up Call: Yelling Doesn't Help
Esther Entin, M.D.

No parent starts out wanting to yell at his or her child. But somewhere along the line, usually in adolescence, most of us do. Read more >


Social Media Like Twitter, Facebook Can Help Smokers Quit
Alice G. Walton

Social media sites can offer people trying to quit smoking the community and support they need to succeed. Read more >


Alcohol Changes Awareness of Drunk Driving
Neil Wagner

People need to decide before they drink that they won't drive. It's too late after they've had a few. Read more >


Oxytocin and The Pleasure We Get from Being Social
Alice G. Walton

The hormone oxytocin helps stimulate human connection. It also appears important to experiencing ple Read more >


The World Happiness Report: People Do Not Live by GDP Alone
Neil Wagner

The World Happiness Report may surprise those who think all they need is a palm tree by the sea. Read more >


Antipsychotic Use in Children
Esther Entin, M.D.

Children taking certain antipsychotics for behavioral problems are far more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Read more >


Poverty's Mental Toll
Leslie Carr

Being poor robs you of mental bandwidth. The toll money worries take is roughly equal to losing 13 points off your IQ score. Read more >


Frustrated Football Fans Find Consolation in Food
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Win or lose, NFL teams' records affect their fans' eating patterns...for better and worse. Read more >


Shining A Light to Turn Off Anxiety
Neil Wagner

When MIT researchers flipped the switch connecting two brain regions, anxiety vanished. Read more >


Soda Consumption and Bad Behavior
Esther Entin, M.D.

It's not clear what it is in soda that brings on aggression and hostility, but the link is there. Read more >


The Color of Light at Night's Effect on Mood
Neil Wagner

The color of light at night affects mood. Blue is depressing. Read more >


The Message of A Messy Desk
Neil Wagner

Disorderly environments can foster creativity. Read more >


The Darker Side of Oxytocin
Neil Wagner

Oxytocin has been called the love hormone. But it's long-term effects are quite different. Read more >


Facebook Use May Reduce Happiness, Not Enhance It
Alice G. Walton

Facebook may actually increase sadness. Be sure to make time to connect for real. Read more >


Weather Changes are Linked to Violence
Alice G. Walton

Tempers rise with temperature, and globally, this is not good news. Read more >


When It Comes to Resolving Conflicts in Relationships, One Size Does Not Fit All
Neil Wagner

When couples fight, issues of disrespect or neglect may underlie the conflict. Read more >


Childhood Iron Deficiency's Long-Term Effects
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Babies with low iron run the risk of a range difficulties that persist into adulthood. Read more >


Singing with Others Synchronizes Hearts and Minds
Alice G. Walton

People who sing together also share changes in heart rate. Read more >


For Millenials, Global Downturn May Have A Silver Lining
Michael J. Gertner

If you survey high school seniors, the global downturn has had some positive, as well as negative, effects. Read more >


Accidents on the Rise for Pedestrians on Cell Phones
Neil Wagner

A pedestrian walks into a lamppost. Drivers distracted by cell phones aren't the only ones in the ER Read more >


Self-Help That Works
John C. Norcross, PhD, Linda F. Campbell, PhD, John M. Grobal, PsyD, John W. Santrock, PhD, Florin Selagea, MS and Robert Sommer



Too Much Time on Your Hands? Volunteering Reduces Hypertension Risk
Charlotte LoBuono

Volunteering is not just good for the soul. It's good for your blood pressure. Read more >


Talk Therapy Helps Depression
Alice G. Walton

Many types of talk therapy work for depression; the important thing is to get started on one. Read more >


Study Finds Probiotics in Yogurt Affect Brain
Michael J. Gertner

You really are what you eat. The probiotics in yogurt actually change the chemistry of your brain. Read more >


Men and Women Look for Different Benefits from Relationships
Alice G. Walton

Men and women value relationships for different reasons. Women value companionship; can you guess what men value? Read more >


Re-Tuning the Brain: Ultrasound's Effect on Mood
Neil Wagner

You can't feel or hear it, but ultrasound improved patients' pain and mood. Read more >


The Genes Behind Circadian Patterns and Major Depression
Michael J. Gertner

If the genes behind our body's clock fall out of sync, depression can be the result. Read more >


In Relationships, Sacrifices Can Backfire
Neil Wagner

Doing something nice for your partner is usually good for the relationship. But not always. When to watch out. Read more >


Affirming Our Priorities Helps Offset the Mental Effects of Stress
Alice G. Walton

Self-affirmations can help you through periods of chronic stress. Read more >


Deep Relaxation Brings Immediate Genetic Changes
Leslie Carr

Meditation, yoga, and other practices that bring deep relaxation can actually alter your genes. Read more >


There's Earning, and Then There's Overearning
Alice G. Walton

Having more than we can possibly use can put dent in happiness. Read more >


Why Overheard Cell Phone Conversations Are So Annoying
Neil Wagner

Why that guy on the cell phone at the table next to you is so annoying. Read more >


Teens' Relationship Problems Predict Their Struggles as Adults
Alice G. Walton

When parents help teens navigate peer social relationships, they improve kids' adult relationships down the road. Read more >


Deep Brain Stimulation Disrupts OCD
Neil Wagner

Obsessions and compulsions are the result of excessive brain activity, not anxiety. DBS can help. Read more >


Aerobic Fitness Raises Scores on Reading and Math Tests
Alice G. Walton

Fitness is more important to academic performance than most people realize. Read more >


It's Healthier To Give than To Receive
Neil Wagner

Helping others isn't just a good thing to do. It's one of the best de-stressors there is. Read more >


Fruits and Veggies Can Improve Your Mood
Charlotte LoBuono

Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables actually seems to improve people's moods. Read more >


The Myth of Multitasking
Charlotte LoBuono

To the guy checking his mail as he talks on the phone: you aren't efficient; you're distracted. Read more >


Obese and Overweight Children Face Serious Health Risks
Esther Entin, M.D.

You wouldn't let your child play near the street unsupervised; don't let him or her eat unsupervised either. Read more >


Yoga May Help Mental Health Disorders, from Depression to Schizophrenia
Alice G. Walton

Yoga can help ease certain mental health disorders. Read more >


Resource Center: Stress



Are Women More Comfortable In Their Skin than Men?
Neil Wagner

Are the near-naked female avatars in games a sign of liberation? Read more >


The School Day Needs More...Recess
Neil Wagner

In Japan, schoolchildren are given a 10-15 minute break every hour. Recess is important to cognitive, physical and social development. Read more >


Surprise! You Won't Be Who You Think You Are
Alice G. Walton

As we age, we tend to think we are pretty much done changing. But the truth is there is more to come. Read more >


Kindness Is a Key to Kids' Happiness and Popularity
Alice G. Walton

When kids are encouraged to be kinder, they also end up being happier and more popular. Read more >


Resource Center: Emotional Health



Bipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents
Esther Entin, M.D.

Moodiness is not uncommon in kids, so how do you know if your child or teen is suffering from mood swings related to this disorder? Read more >


Good Partners Make Good Parents
Neil Wagner

Wondering what kind of parent you will be? Certain qualities make it pretty easy to predict. Read more >


Health Tips to Carry Forward into 2013
Leslie Carr

New years are for fresh starts and self improvement. Here are some findings to take with you into 2013. Read more >


Better Language Skills Help Kids Cope with Emotions
Alice G. Walton

Helping kids with language development gives them the tools to express their emotions, rather than act out. Read more >


The Emotional Lives of Parents
Alice G. Walton

Some studies suggest parenting is linked to happiness, while others claim the opposite. A new one gets closer to the truth. Read more >


How Our Brain Gets Us Motivated
Alice G. Walton

Tracking the brain circuits involved in motivation and depression. Read more >


A Spray to Keep Your Man from Straying
Neil Wagner

A spritz of "love" hormone kept men's eyes from wandering. Is this a new form of chemical warfare or a set-up for a sitcom? Read more >


Kids' Generosity Needs Monitors
Alice G. Walton

Is our “ungenerosity” innate? Read more >


Cyberbullying in Offices is More Common Than You Might Think
Alice G. Walton

Bullying doesn't just happen at school. Cyberbullying at work can affect your mental health. Read more >


Ketamine Research Leads to the First New Depression Drugs in Decades
Neil Wagner

Ketamine is a pediatric anesthetic, a club drug, and now, the most promising antidepressant... Read more >


Off-Label Antipsychotic Use Continues to Rise, Especially in Children
Neil Wagner

Off-label prescribing for kids is way up. So are their serious side effects. The search for... Read more >


Learning to Identify Negative Emotions May Be Important in Battling Depression
Alice G. Walton

Learning to identify your emotions may help with depression. It's not as easy as it sounds. Read more >


Peer Evaluations More Accurate than Personal Ones
Neil Wagner

Your friends know you better than you think. In fact, kids we played with in first grade are... Read more >


An Experimental Drug May Address the Cognitive Problems of PTSD
Alice G. Walton

Post-traumatic stress disorder is more than anxiety. A new drug may help the cognitive problems... Read more >


Shy Preschoolers May Be at a Disadvantage
Alice G. Walton

Children who are quiet or withdrawn may not reap the same benefits of education as the outgoing ones. Read more >


A Gene May Help Explain Happiness in Women, Not Men
Alice G. Walton

A gene previously dubbed the "warrior gene" because of its links to aggression may also be linked... Read more >


The Bus Rider's Dilemma
Neil Wagner

It's common to place your coat on the bus or train seat next to you hoping for solitude... Read more >


The Complicated Relationship between Alcohol and Anxiety
Alice G. Walton

Alcohol addiction may rewire the brain so that it can't rebound from stress. PTSD suffers may want.. Read more >


Relationships, Not Schoolwork, Are the Key to a Good Future
Neil Wagner

When it comes to well-being later in life, having friends is more important than good grades. Read more >


Mindfulness Relieves Loneliness
Neil Wagner

A simple program of mindfulness mediation replaced lonely feelings with a greater appreciation... Read more >


Let it Shine: New Window Coating Lets in More Light
Neil Wagner

A new window coating lets in more light at the blue end of the spectrum. This shift could improve... Read more >


To Find the Most Skilled, Don't Look at the Top
Neil Wagner

Those who aspire to the success of Bill Gates or Mark Zuckerberg might consider role models... Read more >


A Brain Chemical That Makes Bad Memories Disappear
Alice G. Walton

Researchers discover why anxiety can persist for months or years after a stressful event. It's all about a brain chemical. Read more >


Iron Supplements May Help Women With Fatigue
Beth Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

Tired? Women diagnosed with low iron, even when it's not anemia, can benefit from iron supplements. Check with your doctor first. Read more >


Us or Them: Who's to Blame for Our Sugar Problem?
Alice G. Walton

In the "war" against obesity, it seems that the soda industry wants to shift the blame to consumers. Read more >


Experience Taking: How Good Books Can Change You
Neil Wagner

Reading a book can actually change who you are, teaching you about yourself as you live through... Read more >


Shifting When You Eat Could Shift Your Metabolism
Alice G. Walton

Curbing the hours of the day during which you eat could have a big impact on your weight and health. Read more >


Feeling Respected is a Key to Well-Being
Leslie Carr

When it comes to what makes you happy, feeling respected and admired is better than money... Read more >


Oxytocin May Hold Even More Promise for Treating Symptoms of Autism
Alice G. Walton

Oxytocin, the mother-infant bonding hormone, activates the "social" areas of the brain.... Read more >


The Social Dynamics of Coffee Shops
Neil Wagner

If you frequent a coffee shop, you know what it is like to have Wi-Fi access problems or someone at your favorite table. Read more >


Computer Time Could Prevent Cognitive Decline (But Don't Forget to Exercise)
Alice G. Walton

Computer time along with physical activity may prevent cognitive decline. Read more >


A Three-Hour Therapy Session Could Treat Arachnophobia
Alice G. Walton

People so afraid of spiders that they wouldn't walk on grass were cured of their phobia with... Read more >


Traumatic Brain Injuries May Be Rising for Young Football Players
Alice G. Walton

Fatal brain injuries in high school football players rose last year. Read more >


Being Aware of Your Own Mortality Can Make for a Better Life
Alice G. Walton

Being aware of our mortality can actually help us live richer, fuller lives. Read more >


Puttering About Could Reduce Your Risk for Alzheimer's Disease
Alice G. Walton

The simplest activities, even housework, can reduce your risk for cognitive decline. Read more >


Social Jet Lag May Be Why You're Fatigued (And Fat)
Alice G. Walton

Our daily schedules are out of sync with our internal clocks. It started with the light bulb... Read more >


The Happiness Dilemma
Alice G. Walton

The pursuit of happiness is not as simple as we might think. What you focus on can make a big difference to your health. Read more >


A Snapshot of Stress Across the Generations
Alice G. Walton

The Millennial generation is more stressed than generations before. They are also less able to cope. Read more >


Losing Weight May Not Change Body Image
Alice G. Walton

Losing weight may not make body image issues disappear. Read more >


Recess: A Learning Opportunity
Esther Entin, M.D.

Recess can be an arena for bullies or a lab for learning the social skills needed to get past conflict. Read more >


Ladies, There's No Turning Back the Biological Clock
Alice G. Walton

Delaying motherhood may mean forgoing motherhood. But there are options if you think ahead. Read more >


Who Will Divorce?
Alice G. Walton

Even the happiest newlyweds can go on to divorce. But early warning signs might predict who does... Read more >


Failing Has Its Benefits For Kids
Alice G. Walton

Teaching kids that failing is a part of learning can give them the confidence to do well. Read more >


Dogs In the Workplace Can Reduce Stress
Leslie Carr

Taking your pup to work can reduce stress and may increase workers' productivity... Read more >


Brain Cells Benefit from the Company of Others
Alice G. Walton

Brain connections that form when we learn something new are strengthened when there are friends near Read more >


A Connection between Cognition and Personality
Alice G. Walton

When seniors improve their cognitive skills, their personalities also get a boost. Read more >


More Insight into How the Mediterranean Diet Benefits Body and Mind
Alice G. Walton

People who follow the Mediterranean diet do better mentally as they age. Now we know why... Read more >


One Reason Why the Rich Get Richer
Neil Wagner

Are the rich really more ethically-challenged than the rest of us? Are other factors at work? Read more >


The Stress-Immunity Connection
Alice G. Walton

Stress can lead to reduced immune system function. Reduce stress, reduce your odds for illness. Read more >


The Power of Good Intentions
Neil Wagner

Food tastes better and pain hurts less when it comes from people with good intentions. Read more >


Testosterone: The "Me" Hormone
Neil Wagner

When women were given testosterone and asked to solve a problem, cooperation went way down... Read more >


Endorphins May Explain Why Alcohol Makes Us Feel Happy
Alice G. Walton

Alcohol works by releasing "feel good" chemicals, endorphins, in the brain, which could explain its addictiveness. Read more >


Massage Boosts the Recovery of Muscles After Exercise
Alice G. Walton

A ten-minute massage can help sore muscles heal after vigorous exercise. Read more >


A Second Look at Antidepressants and Suicide
Esther Entin, M.D.

Antidepressants can literally be lifesavers for people with depression. Read more >


One in Five Americans Suffers from Mental Health Problems
Alice G. Walton

One in five Americans suffers from mental health problems. There is no reason to feel uncomfortable about seeking help. Read more >


Why Brain Imaging Studies Can Be Misleading
Neil Wagner

Brain scans provide valuable information, but their meaning is often oversimplified. Read more >


Healthy Food Choices May Be as Simple as Green for Go
Alice G. Walton

Two simple changes help people make the smarter food choices. Now to get stores and cafeterias to... Read more >


At The Intersection of Grief and Depression, A Controversy
Alice G. Walton

A top medical journal questions whether the move to classify grief as depression has merit. Read more >


Physical Activity and School Performance
Esther Entin, M.D.

Children do better in school when they have more opportunity for physical activity, not more time at a desk. Read more >


Punch Drunk: Repetitive Brain Injury
Alice G. Walton

Chronic head injuries can cause dementia, violence and death. Helmets may not help. Read more >


Facebook: Not for the Negative
Neil Wagner

People with heartfelt Facebook posts about what's wrong in their world may end up with less traffic. Read more >


Physical Punishment Takes A Toll on Kids' Mental Health
Alice G. Walton

Physical punishment does more harm than good to a child and encourages aggressive behavior. Other methods are more effective. Read more >


For Mood Disorders, Combined Therapy Works Better
Neil Wagner

A study shows how a combination of antidepressants and therapy helps reduce memories' impact... Read more >


The Impact of Bad Bosses
Alice G. Walton

A controlling, coercive boss can take a toll on your well being. But there is more to it than that. Read more >


Conflict and Conversation in Relationships
Leslie Carr

Trying to figure out whether your partner is a keeper? A new study suggests where you should look. Read more >


Humble People to the Rescue
Alice G. Walton

Need help? Call on your humble friends. Those who are arrogant may let you down. Read more >


The Need to Feel Connected
Neil Wagner

Our need to connect is so strong that being ignored or given the air gaze, bothers us... Read more >


The Internet as Matchmaker
Alice G. Walton

Internet dating is one of the top methods for finding love, whether the pros outweigh the cons... Read more >


Preschool Attachment and Teen Obesity: Is There a Link?
Esther Entin, M.D.

Teens rated as less attached during infancy were almost 2.5 times more likely to become obese... Read more >


More Education Improves IQ
Alice G. Walton

An extra year or two of education can raise IQ significantly, even if the students are already teens Read more >


The Marriage Problem
Alice G. Walton

Marriage carries with it the threat of divorce. But it also offers significant health benefits. Read more >


Resolution Rx
Leslie Carr

Has the thrill of the resolution you made in December given way to a sense of defeat? You can fix it. Read more >


The Write Diet
Neil Wagner

Writing about your most important values may help you lose weight. Read more >


Oxytocin Could Help Introverts Feel More Outgoing
Alice G. Walton

The mother-baby bonding hormone, oxytocin, made introverts feel more outgoing and trusting. Read more >


Indecision and Lack of Commitment Breed Unhappiness
Neil Wagner

Some people constantly doubt themselves rather than committing to their choices, no matter how small Read more >


Uncovering Why Marijuana Has Opposing Effects on the Brain
Alice G. Walton

Smoking pot can make people calm, anxious, or even psychotic. A study reveals the chemical culprit.. Read more >


The Connection Between Good Nutrition and Good Cognition Becomes Clearer
Alice G. Walton

Good nutrition and brain health go hand in hand; changing your diet can help protect your brain. Read more >


Having Trouble with Parenthood? You Are Not Alone
Alice G. Walton

Having kids interrupts your sleep, destabilizes your relationship, and costs lots of money and time. So what's the upside? Read more >


Understanding the Roots of Social Prejudice Could Help Us Counteract It
Alice G. Walton

A new look at prejudice finds it may mostly exist just because we're afraid of germs. Read more >


A Better Way to Reduce Prejudice
Alice G. Walton

When people are told to be less prejudiced, they are often more so. There's a better way. Read more >


Bad Bosses Follow You Home
Neil Wagner

Having a difficult, abusive boss can strain personal relationships at home. Read more >


Dreams Can Help Heal Mental Wounds
Alice G. Walton

REM sleep can reduce the emotional impact of traumatic memories. Read more >


The "Rich Clubs" Make up an Elite Network in the Brain
Alice G. Walton

"Rich Club" clusters of highly influential regions of brain cells do serious collaboration. Read more >


Gestational BPA Linked to Developmental Problems in Girls, Not Boys
Alice G. Walton

Higher BPA levels during pregnancy are linked to cognitive and emotional problems in children. Read more >


Measuring Happiness Now Could Predict Death Risk Years Later
Alice G. Walton

Happiness measured at one point in time was linked to lower mortality five years later. Read more >


Stressful Life Events Can Up Death Risk: But There's a Limit
Alice G. Walton

Going through a string of difficult life events in middle age raises one's death risk. Read more >


Embarrassment is Linked to Dependability, Generosity
Alice G. Walton

People who become embarrassed more readily are also more dependable and generous. Read more >


Can Parents Complete with Clever Marketing to Kids?
Alice G. Walton

It's hard to compete with clever marketing, but you can help your kids make better food choices with consistent encouragement. Read more >


Tweet This: Twitter As Research Tool
Leslie Carr

The timing and emotional tenor of Twitter posts offer a picture of when we are happiest and when... Read more >


Researchers Show that "Paying Attention" May Distort Reality
Alice G. Walton

The mind is notorious for playing tricks, but researchers discover paying attention can mislead us.. Read more >


How We React to Stress Influences Performance
Alice G. Walton

How you interpret your stress can influence how you perform on tests. Read more >


Researchers Unravel How Stress Leads to Depression
Alice G. Walton

Stress can lead to depression, but new brain cells may be responsible for stopping the process... Read more >


Parenting and Temperament: Does "Goodness of Fit" Matter?
Esther Entin, M.D.

Certain styles of parenting are more beneficial for children with difficult temperaments, such as the anxious or depressed. Read more >


Generalized Anxiety and Interpersonal Relationship Problems Deeply Intertwined
Alice G. Walton

People with anxiety often have problematic social relationships, partly as a result of their worries Read more >


Overeating Explained by Three Neurological Processes, Not Laziness
Alice G. Walton

Overeating involves neurological processes involving impulse control and reward, not laziness. Read more >


Learning to Be Positive May Help Beat Depression
Alice G. Walton

Positive activity intervention (PAI) such as writing letters of gratitude or performing acts of kindness, may help mild depression. Read more >


Speech Processing May Be at the Heart of Dyslexia
Alice G. Walton

The root of dyslexia may be in speech processing, a surprise to researchers... Read more >


Certain Personality Traits Linked to More Weight Gain
Alice G. Walton

People who have certain personality traits, like impulsivity and cynicism, are more likely to gain weight over time. Read more >


Grape Seed Extract - and Perhaps Red Wine - May Fend off Alzheimer's
Alice G. Walton

Grape seed extract – and perhaps red wine – shows promise as a way to slow... Read more >


Training in Positive Thinking Helps Teens Interpret Life in Healthier Ways
Alice G. Walton

A simple computer program seems to help teens avoid negative thinking, which may help with anxiety.. Read more >


"Late Talkers" Turn Out Just Fine
Alice G. Walton

Children with language delays have no more behavioral or emotional problems as adolescents than other kids. Read more >


Scientists Gain Clues into How Imagination Affects Actions
Alice G. Walton

New research shows how our ability to imagine affects our reactions and our ability to plan... Read more >


Pediatric Mental Health Emergencies: Where are they Treated?
Esther Entin, M.D.

Too often, children with behavioral or emotional issues are taken to the ER. Read more >


Stressful Events Lead to Unexpected Reaction in Panic Patients
Alice G. Walton

You might think people with panic disorder would fall apart in a crisis, but that's not the case... Read more >


The Roots of Body Dysmorphic Disorder
Alice G. Walton

People with body dysmorphic disorder have problems in the brain's visual processing system. Read more >


The Color Red Boosts Speed and Intensity of Performance
Alice G. Walton

Looking at the color red actually boosts the strength and speed of our physical reactions. Read more >


What Is It About Relationships?
Ann Weber, Ph.D.

Psychologists have discovered some unexpected things about the close relationships key to well being. Read more >


Violence in Cartoons Does Not Make Them More Enjoyable
Alice G. Walton

Contrary to popular belief, kids do not enjoy violent cartoons any more than nonviolent ones... Read more >


Strong Social Support Systems at Work May Lengthen Life
Alice G. Walton

Getting along well with the coworkers may lengthen your life. Getting along with the boss... not... Read more >


Cutting Out Gluten May Work for Even Asymptomatic Celiac Patients
Alice G. Walton

People with celiac disease showing few or no symptoms may still benefit by going gluten-free. Read more >


Cooperation and Guilt Linked in the Brain
Alice G. Walton

Do we cooperate with others to experience positive feelings or avoid the bad ones? Read more >


Reducing Stress May Boost Success Rate with IVF
Alice G. Walton

Reducing stress can improve the odds of becoming pregnant through in vitro fertilization. Read more >


Family Meals Help Cut Childhood Obesity
Alice G. Walton

Just having kids cut their fat intake does not help them lose weight. So what does work? Read more >


When Neurons Nap, Mistakes are Made
Alice G. Walton

In sleep-deprived rats random brain cells take "naps" while the animal is awake... Read more >


Alcoholism May Be Linked to Impulsivity Gene, Brain Differences
Alice G. Walton

People with alcoholism in the family tend to have a genetic variation affecting impulsivity. Environmental factors also play a role. Read more >


Food May Activate Same Addiction Centers in the Brain as Drugs
Alice G. Walton

Food addiction and drug addiction may activate the same reward areas of the brain. Read more >


Physical and Emotional Pain Have Similar Effect on the Brain
Alice G. Walton

The emotional pain of romantic relationship break-up has the same effect on the brain as physical... Read more >


Omega-3 Supplements May Ease PMS
Alice G. Walton

Omega-3 fatty acids supplements may help ease symptoms in women who suffer from PMS. Read more >


The Larger the Society, the More Outstanding Its Members
Alice G. Walton

A study has found that the larger the society, the more distinctive its members tend to become. Read more >


"Talk Therapy" May Rewire the Brain
Alice G. Walton

Anxious? Cognitive behavior therapy can help. The changes it brings can be seen in the brain itself. Read more >


Attached
Amir Levine, M.D., and Rachel S.F. Heller, M.A.



Exercise May Be Best Bet for IBS Sufferers
Alice G. Walton

Exercise significantly reduces the severity of IBS symptoms. Read more >


Waiting Longer to Begin HRT May Reduce Your Risk of Breast Cancer
Alice G. Walton

Waiting longer than five years to begin hormones after menopause may reduce the risk of breast cancer associated with HRT. Read more >


Pencils Better Than Pixels When It Comes to Learning
Alice G. Walton

Writing by hand promotes learning far more than pressing a key. So what are we to do? Read more >


Meditation Changes the Cells of the Brain
Alice G. Walton

Meditation changes the brain, with areas related to learning and memory expanding and areas related to anxiety, contracting. Read more >


Menopause Symptoms Are Linked to Reduced Breast Cancer Risk, Say Researchers
Alice G. Walton

Hot flashes and other symptoms of menopause may actually have a protective effect when it comes to certain cancers. Read more >


Kids' Friends May Be Big Influence on Grades
Alice G. Walton

Kids' friends may have a bigger influence on how well they do in school than parents do. Read more >


New Research Shows Us Why We Should Listen to the Heart
Alice G. Walton

Do people listen to their bodies have better instincts when it comes to making intuitive decisions? Read more >


Mediterranean Diet May Keep the Brain Young
Alice G. Walton

Eating a Mediterranean-style diet significantly slows cognitive decline in seniors. Read more >


The Happiness of the Unemployed Rises Again
Alice G. Walton

If you've been laid off, take heart: new research shows that within one year, you'll be about as happy as you were before the layoff. Read more >


Can "Good" Cholesterol Help the Brain, Like the Heart, Stay Fit?
Alice G. Walton

In addition to helping your heart, higher levels of HDL ("good") cholesterol may reduce your risk of Alzheimer's disease. Read more >


Scientists Make Big Strides in Understanding the Cause of Alzheimer's
Alice G. Walton

It is not that Alzheimer's brains overproduce dangerous plaques; they have trouble getting rid of... Read more >


Can Sleep Deprivation Prevent Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder?
Alice G. Walton

Scientists have found a way to disrupt upsetting memories of traumatic events: sleep deprivation. Read more >


Nice Guys Don't Finish Last; They Get Married
Neil Wagner

Marriage appears to make men nicer, though it's also true nice men are more likely to marry. Read more >


Even A Little Smoke Poses "Immediate" Risk to the Body
Alice G. Walton

According to the Surgeon General, there is no safe level of cigarette smoke, even if it is secondhand. Read more >


Antidepressant Use Climbs as Talk Therapy Rates Drop - But Is Mindfulness the Key?
Alice G. Walton

More people are seeking treatment for depression. But the type of treatment they choose may not be.. Read more >


The Happiness Project
Gretchen Rubin



New HIV/AIDS Pill Offers Big Protection When Used As Directed
Alice G. Walton

Truvada offers good protection from HIV infection. Will the CDC approve it? Read more >


More Evidence That Mammograms Under 50 May Reduce Risk
Alice G. Walton

Just in: Another new study finds that early mammograms may bring big benefits to women under 50. Read more >


Energy Drinks Linked to Alcohol Consumption in College Kids
Alice G. Walton

College kids who drink more energy drinks also consume more alcohol: coincidence or cause? Read more >


Synthetic Marijuana Worse Than the Real Stuff
Alice G. Walton

Synthetic marijuana, often legal and sold at convenience stores, can be more deadly than the real thing. Read more >


Is a Wandering Mind an Unhappy Mind?
Neil Wagner

What are you thinking of right now? Was your mind wandering? Happier people tend to have minds focused on the present moment. Read more >


When One Half of the Brain Is Damaged, the Other Half Compensates
Alice G. Walton

When part of the brain is damaged, it often gets an assist from undamaged areas to pick up the slack Read more >


Stress Not So Bad for the Belly
Alice G. Walton

Stress isn't behind as much weight gain as was previously thought, but there are sex differences... Read more >


Age Like a Fine Wine
Neil Wagner

Aging well has been linked to three factors: faith in your ability to exert control over your life, social support and exercise. Read more >


New Mothers' Brains May Grow Larger
Alice G. Walton

The thrill and pleasure of a new baby appear to stimulate brain growth, particularly in areas... Read more >


More Teens Are Reporting Hearing Loss
Alice G. Walton

Teens' hearing has gotten worse. It may be from having the iPod or MP3 up too loud. Read more >


Close Friends "Light Up" The Brain
Alice G. Walton

Close friends activate "social" areas of your brain more than strangers do. Read more >


Evidence that Violent Media Desensitizes Teenage Boys
Neil Wagner

Boys used to violent video clips have less response to them. Does this increase the likelihood... Read more >


Paying with Cash Curbs Junk Food Spending
Alice G. Walton

Research shows that if you pay with cash instead of credit, you'll be less likely to buy junk food Read more >


Hormones Raise Cancer Risk
Alice G. Walton

Hormone replacement therapy may increase the risk of developing breast cancer and of dying from it. Read more >


Vitamin B12 Linked to Reduced Risk of Alzheimer's Disease
Alice G. Walton

Higher B12 levels are linked to reduced risk of cognitive decline, including Alzheimer's disease. Read more >


Is Morning Sickness a Good Thing?
Alice G. Walton

Women who experience morning sickness are less likely to miscarry than women who do not... Read more >


A Hard-Knock Life May Do You Good Down the Road
Alice G. Walton

Facing some adversity in your life may help you better cope with stress and be happier later on. Read more >


Too Much Screen Time Bad for Kids' Psychology
Alice G. Walton

Limiting kids' TV and computer time can improve their ability to pay attention and reduce the risk of psychological problems. Read more >


Alcohol and Violence: An Earlier Last Call May Help
Neil Wagner

An earlier last call at bars can lower the number of assaults and other alcohol-related violence. Read more >


Anger and Sadness Increase Pain
Neil Wagner

Anger and sadness tend to make a person's experience of pain worse. Read more >


Bad Habits Make Bad Employees, Study Finds
Alice G. Walton

People who smoke, overeat, or don't exercise take more sick days, while those who drink take fewer. Read more >


Contagious Yawning Teaches Researchers About Social Development
Alice G. Walton

Contagious yawning is familiar to most. But did you know it is a form of normal social bonding... Read more >


Loneliness Comes from Within
Neil Wagner

Loneliness is not so much a condition as a reflection of how we see ourselves and others. Read more >


It's Quality, Not Quantity, of Sleep That's Important for New Moms
Alice G. Walton

Even though they may total enough hours at night, interrupted sleep is what hurts new moms. Read more >


Luckily, Cancer Risk Does Not Depend on Personality, Researchers Find
Alice G. Walton

The idea that one's personality can contribute to cancer has not been found to be true. Read more >


Worrying About Falling May Make It Happen - So Relax!
Alice G. Walton

Seniors who worry about falling actually fall more than those who don't. Read more >


Reduce Your Anger, Reduce Your Heart Risk
Alice G. Walton

Relax. Being angry may cause your arteries to thicken and increase your risk for heart attack and stroke. Read more >


Youngest Children in Their Class Most Likely to Be Diagnosed with ADHD
Neil Wagner

Before accepting a diagnosis of attention-deficit disorder, consider whether your child is young for his or her grade in school. Read more >


How You See Others Says a Lot about You
Neil Wagner

How we see others says more about our own personalities than it does about theirs'. Read more >


Too Much Mac-N-Cheese? Lure Your Kids to Healthy Eating With a Little Fun
Alice G. Walton

Adding some fun activities to meal preparation improves kids' attitude toward fruits and vegetables. Read more >


People's Brains "Coupled" to Each Other in Good Conversation
Alice G. Walton

The better we understand another, the closer our brain patterns resemble theirs, neutral coupling... Read more >


Kids Read More When They Pick the Books
Neil Wagner

Let your child choose his or her summer reading books. Reading anything helps keep those skills sharp and helps in school. Read more >


Being More Connected to Those Around You May Lengthen Your Life
Alice G. Walton

Having a strong social support system rivals quitting smoking in terms of the years it can add to our lives. Read more >


Don't Throw Out the Rabbit's Foot: Good Luck Charms May Just Work
Alice G. Walton

Have a good luck charm? It may actually help performance by boosting confidence Read more >


Scanner Predicts Behavior Better than People Do
Neil Wagner

A study using MRI scans of subjects' brains found that scan results can predict behavior better... Read more >


A New Look At Postpartum Depression
Neil Wagner

New mothers have elevated levels of MAO-A, an enzyme known to deactivate neurotransmitters that affect mood. Read more >


Managing Obesity: A Work In Progress
Lawrence J. Cheskin, M.D., and Scott Kahan, M.D., M.P.H.

Two physicians discuss the risks of obesity. Learn to recognize the behavioral triggers behind overeating and overcome them. Read more >


Just 20 Minutes Outdoors Can Work Wonders
Neil Wagner

Just 20 minutes out in nature - even a small garden - can help re-energize you. Read more >


Cutting: Teens Who Hurt Themselves
Esther Entin, M.D.

The medical community calls it "non-suicidal self-injury" (NSSI); the kids call it "cutting." Read more >


Researchers Surprised by How the Brain and Body React to Anger-Inducing Phrases
Alice G. Walton

Feelings of anger seem to make a person want to get closer to the anger-inducing stimulus... Read more >


Who Knew? Study Shows that Fathers Experience Postpartum Depression, Too
Alice G. Walton

New fathers and fathers-to-be are at higher risk for depression than other men, particularly if their wives are depressed. Read more >


Overtime Ups Risk of Death from Heart Disease
Alice G. Walton

People who work a great deal of overtime are at greater risk of heart-related death. Type A behavior may be partly to blame. Read more >


Alcohol and Adolescents: The Need to Teach our Children Well
Esther Entin, M.D.

Teen drinking is not like on TV. There are real risks, like auto accidents and impaired brain development. Read more >


Magnet Therapy May Help Treat Depression When Drugs Don't Work
Alice G. Walton

Administering magnetic pulses to patients with intractable depression seems to be effective... Read more >


Nerve Block May Help Treat Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
Alice G. Walton

A promising experimental treatment for intractable PTSD involves anesthetizing the nerves of the stellate ganglion. Read more >


To Boost Your Self-Esteem and Mood, Exercise in the Green, Researchers Say
Alice G. Walton

If you are feeling a little down, head outdoors. Just five minutes outside boosts mood and self-esteem. Read more >


Kids and Screens: Media and Health
Esther Entin, M.D.

Teens' screen time offers risks and rewards. How to minimize the risks. Read more >


Side Effects of Antidepressants More Common Than Previously Thought
Neil Wagner

Antidepressant medications have many side effects. Too often these go unreported by doctors and patients. Read more >


The Female Reproductive Cycle...Explained
Alice G. Walton

The hormonal changes surrounding ovulation are often intense. Read more >


Exercise as Mental Health Treatment
Neil Wagner

Exercise is a useful component of any mental health treatment plan. Read more >


Meaningful Talk May Be Linked to Happiness
Alice G. Walton

Small talk can help in some social situations, but people who engage in more substantial conversations tend to be happier. Read more >


Yoga Begins to Reveal Its Secrets
Neil Wagner

Yoga appears to help the body by reducing its inflammatory response to stress. Read more >


Better Relationships Cut Teenage Weight Gain
Neil Wagner

Negative emotions can contribute to overeating or binge eating. Therapy aimed at improving social skills can therefore help prevent weight Read more >


Kids' Mental Health Needs Often Unmet
Esther Entin, M.D.

Treating children for mental health problems can reduce the risk that the problems will get worse. Read more >


Well Adjusted, Over 40, and Single
Alice G. Walton

People who have never married are as basically as well-adjusted as those who are. But their autonomy has a price. Read more >


These Are The Good Times
Alice G. Walton

Appreciating even the smallest positive moments in your life builds emotional strength, and wards off stress and depression. Read more >


Exercise as Mood Enhancer
Neil Wagner

People feel good after exercising and this feeling can last up to 12 hours. Read more >


Happiness Doesn't Come from Material, "American Dream"-Type Goals, New Study Finds
Alice G. Walton

Being beautiful, rich, and famous doesn't actually equate with being happy. More important are personal growth and social relationships. Read more >


Improving Children's Mental Health: An Updated Agenda and a Roadmap
Esther Entin, M.D.

Resilience, the ability to thrive in the face of extreme adversity, is a reason why some children develop successfully while others fail. Read more >


Violent Video Games Dampen Players' Reaction to Others' Pain
Alice Walton

Playing violent video games and watching violent films make people insensitive to others' pain and less likely to notice others' distress. Read more >


Music May Be Good for the Heart, Literally
Alice G. Walton

Listening to pleasurable music helps dilate blood vessels significantly, just as blood pressure medications like statins do. Read more >


Exercise Helps Moderate Anger in Overweight Children
Alice G. Walton

Exercise appears to reduce children's anger as it increases fitness. Read more >


Happiness Is Contagious, New Study Finds
Alice G. Walton

People who rate themselves the happiest tend to be at the center of their social networks. Read more >


Far Beyond The Three R's
Esther Entin, M.D.

Social skills, such as knowing how to resist peer pressure, endure beyond childhood and support a person's success in adulthood. Read more >


Bad Managers Raise Risk of Heart Disease
Neil Wagner

Stress at work from a bad boss can increase your risk of heart disease. Read more >


Keeping Those Pounds Off
Neil Wagner

When it comes to maintaining weight loss, telephone counseling appears to be just as effective as face-to-face counseling. Read more >


Optimism Pays Off for Heart Patients
Neil Wagner

Having a positive outlook can improve a heart patient's outcome. Read more >


Music Soothes the Stroke-Injured Brain
Tom Gilbert

According to fairy tales, music has the power to tame savage beasts. Read more >


Days Off
Tom Gilbert

According to a new study, American workers took over a billion days off for mental health reasons. Read more >


Dealing with Chronic Pain: The Mind Body Solution
Hilary Tindle, M.D., M.P.H.



Smoking, Quitting and Genetics
Eric Siu, M.Sc., Nael Al Koudsi, H.B.Sc., Man Ki Ho, H.B.Sc., Rachel F. Tyndale, M.Sc., Ph.D

Nicotine's addictive properties are a result of the activation of the special receptors in the brain. Read more >


Stress and Allergy
Rosalind J. Wright, M.D., M.P.H., and Sheldon Cohen, Ph.D

Have you ever noticed that sometimes when you're having a really tough day, you sneeze a lot and your skin feels itchier? It's not a coincidence, your emotions may have been the trigger. Read more >


A Body to Die For: The ABC's of Eating Disorders
Kathryn J. Zerbe, M.D.

Recovering bulimics should protect their teeth by NOT brushing vigorously. Read more >


A Fate Worse than Debt: Credit Cards and Stress
Tom Gilbert

Most Americans know from personal experience that high credit card debt is bad for their financial health. Read more >


The Response to Stress
Bruce McEwen, Ph.D., and Dean Krahn, M.D

What do we mean when we say we are "stressed out"? We may just be having a bad day, or feeling pressured by too many things to do and too little time to do them. Read more >





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